Defining the Geopolitics of a Thirsty WorldSM
Archive for September, 2014

Thirsty Dragon: A Canal Too Far?

Via The Economist, commentary that the world’s biggest water-diversion project will do little to alleviate water scarcity: THREE years ago the residents of Hualiba village in central China’s Henan province were moved 10km (six miles) from their homes into squat, yellow houses far from any source of work or their newly allocated fields. These days […]

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The Thirsty Dragon: Vast New Waterways Will Not Solve Shortages

Courtesy of The Economist, a look at China’s South-North Water Diversion Project: SOON the centrepiece of one of China’s most spectacular engineering projects will be completed, with the opening of sluicegates into a canal stretching over 1,200km (750 miles) from the Yangzi river north to the capital, Beijing. The new channel is only part of […]

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South Asia’s Water Dilemma

Via Eurasia Review, an interesting look at South Asia’s water challenges: Water is the most necessary constituent for the survival of living things on earth. Without water nothing can exist; it is the most precious gift of nature. Apart from the drinking usage, it is also vital for the economic and agricultural development of any […]

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Unprecedented Drought Puts Sao Paulo Water Supply At Risk

Via The Globe and Mail, a report on Sao Paulo’s water crisis: It’s a game of chance, every time Zeina Reis da Cruz turns on her taps: Will anything come out? “Sometimes I have no water for two days, then it comes back on the next day and the day after that, I have no […]

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Nile Water War?

Courtesy of STRATFOR (subscription required), a detailed look at tensions over the Nile’s water: In the 21st century, water could emerge as a more precious commodity than oil. As populations rise, albeit at a slower rate than in the previous century, water becomes a more valuable and critical resource. This is especially true if certain […]

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Nepal Launches Hydropower Growth Plan

Via the Financial Times, a report on Nepal’s newly launched hydropower-based growth plan: Nepal is to start exploiting the untapped hydropower resources of its Himalayan rivers by signing the biggest foreign investment deal in its history to build a $1.4bn project on the upper Karnali River. Investment Board Nepal signed the agreement with Indian infrastructure […]

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