Defining the Geopolitics of a Thirsty WorldSM
Cape Town Risk of ‘Day Zero’ Drought Seen Rising

Via Smart Water Magazine, a report on Cape Town’s water challenge: Cape Town faces an 80% higher chance of another ‘Day Zero’ drought by the end of the century if greenhouse gas-emissions keep rising at current rates, research showed on Monday, as the South African city races to safeguard water supplies. Following a 2018 drought […]

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Mexico’s Water Dispute With the U.S. Is a Symptom of Its Governance Crisis

Via World Politics Review, commentary on US / Mexico water tensions: For nearly 75 years, the United States and Mexico have transferred giant quantities of water to each other each year as part of a system set up to ensure the equitable sharing of water sheds that straddle their border. The terms and obligations are […]

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Sudan: Latest Nile Dam Talks “Failed”

Via Terra Daily, an update on the latest round of discussions on sharing of the Nile: Sudan said Wednesday the latest round of talks with Egypt and Ethiopia over Addis Ababa’s controversial dam on the Blue Nile ended after they failed to make headway. The negotiations, held over videoconference, kicked off Sunday and were meant […]

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Severe Drought In South America

Via Smart Water Magazine, an article on South America’s drought: Large parts of South America are in the grip of a serious drought. Signs of the drought began to appear in satellite gravimetry observations of southeastern Brazil in mid-2018 and had spread into parts of Paraguay, Bolivia, and northern Argentina by 2020. “This is the second most intense drought in […]

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Will Texas Taps Soon Run Dry?

Via World Economic Forum, a report on water scarcity in Texas: Population growth, a booming economy and the demands of development are set to strain Texas’ water supplies to the limit. A similar trend is unfolding in other major economies around the world, such as China and India. As things stand, the Lone Star State […]

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Central Asia Risks Becoming A Hyper-Arid Desert In Near Future

Via The Conversation, a report on water stress in Central Asia: Around 34 million years ago, sudden climate change caused ecological breakdown in Central Asia. This ancient event, triggered by rapid drops in temperature and atmospheric carbon dioxide, permanently affected biological diversity in the region. Large areas of Mongolia, (geographic) Tibet and north-western China suddenly […]

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