Defining the Geopolitics of a Thirsty WorldSM
Archive for November, 2010

Parched for Peace (2): UAE Has Oil & Money, But No Water

Courtesy of Columbia’s Earth Institute, an interesting look at the Middle East’s water crisis: “…Last Monday I mentioned that one of the reasons I chose to focus on the Mideast water crisis was a New York Times article that called attention to the extreme water scarcity in Dubai. While its seven star hotel, indoor ski […]

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The Thirsty Dragon Makes Nervous Neighbors

Courtesy of ChinaDialogue, a look at the increasing tensions arising from the construction of a large-scale dam in Tibet that is prompting fears downstream on the Brahmaputa.  As the article notes: “…Only five rivers in the world carry more water than the Yarlung Zangbo, or Brahmaputra as it is known when it reaches India. Only […]

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Caspian Politics: Sea or Lake?

Via The National, a report summarizing the dilemma and regional politics surrounding the Caspian Sea: “…Is the Caspian a sea or a lake? Maybe a rather metaphysical question for the business section but the answer could have profound results for the central Asian energy industry, which holds perhaps the largest amount of under-exploited oil and […]

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Ethiopia: Cairo Might Turn To Military Action Over Nile

Via The Khaleej Times, a report on Ethiopia’s recent suggestions that Egypt might turn to military force to maintain its Nile waters.  As the article notes: “…Egypt said it was “amazed” by Ethiopia’s suggestion on Tuesday that Cairo might turn to military action in a row over the Nile waters, saying it did not want […]

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The Thirsty Dragon and Parched Tiger: China defends Brahmaputra Dam Project Amid Indian Concern

Via Terra Daily, an interesting report that China on Thursday defended it decision to build a dam on the Brahmaputra river in Tibet, amid concerns it could disrupt water supplies downstream in India and harm ecosystems.  As the article notes: “…In the development of cross-border water resources, China has always had a responsible attitude and […]

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The Thirsty Dragon: Chinese Dams On The Mekong Not To Be Damned, Says Cambodia

Via Terra Daily, a report that Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen dismissed concerns Wednesday that Chinese dams were responsible for the Mekong River’s low water levels, telling environmentalists not to be “too extreme”.  As the article notes: “…Hun Sen blamed decades-low water levels in southeast Asia’s longest river on “irregular rainfall” caused by global climate […]

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