Defining the Geopolitics of a Thirsty WorldSM
Archive for September, 2013

Damming The Mekong: Fish-Friendly?

Via The Economist, a look at the controversy over the Xayaburi dam: ALONG the banks of the Mekong in Laos, the forest has been stripped and the mountainside gouged out. Construction of the Xayaburi dam, the first on the lower Mekong, is in full swing. The dam, which will cost $3.5 billion, is being built […]

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In Drought, Water Wars Fought Underground

Via Yahoo!, a report on what is apt to become an increasing venue for water tension – groundwater: For decades, this city in California’s agricultural heartland relied exclusively on cheap, plentiful groundwater and pumped increasingly larger amounts from an aquifer as its population grew. But eventually, the water table dropped by more than 100 feet, […]

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Can Kenya’s Hidden Aquifer Prevent A Water War?

Via Gizmodo, an interesting article on the wide ranging implications of the recent aquifer discovery in Kenya:   This week’s jaw-dropping news that a massive aquifer has been discovered beneath Kenya conjured up all sorts of visions of the desert instantly greening like a Chia Pet. But it’s not as easy as digging a well—the […]

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Nile Water Dispute Stymies Egypt Reset with African Union

Via Al-Monitor, a look at the tension over the Nile River: Egypt is still facing multiple hurdles in managing its diplomatic relations and national security interests with other African nations, particularly those of the Nile basin. This is despite the new Egyptian political administration showing capacity to bolster relations with countries of the African continent. […]

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Libya’s Government Facing Water Threat

Via Terra Daily, an article on Libya’s water challenges: Libya’s fragile government, grappling with marauding militias that have virtually shut down the country’s vital oil industry, has another big problem in its struggle to impose control — water supplies. Militants loyal to the late Moammar Gadhafi seized control of the Great Man-Made River, a $33 […]

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Pakistan’s Water Woes

Via East Asia Forum, an interesting look at Pakistan’s water issues: While energy shortages, economic stagnation, terrorism and religious intolerance remain in the spotlight, water shortages pose one of the most significant threats to Pakistan. Regrettably, the Pakistani discourse on the subject remains in a state of delusion and is thus misdirected. In the 66 […]

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