Defining the Geopolitics of a Thirsty WorldSM
Archive for September, 2011

The Hydro-Challenges of the New State of South Sudan in the Nile Basin

Via The International Water Law Project, a detailed look at the hydropolitical issues that may arise in East Africa with the emergence of South Sudan: On January 9, 2011, and for the next six days, the people of South Sudan exercised their right of self determination and voted overwhelmingly to secede from the Sudan and […]

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The Thirsty Dragon: North/South Water Resettlement – Success Or Failure?

Courtesy of The Guardian, an article on the human impact and politics of China’s huge project to relocate 345,000 people as part of a multibillion dollar, 50-year mega-project to bring water from the country’s southern rivers to the arid north. But while migrants have been promised new homes, compensation and farmland, many are discovering that […]

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India and Pakistan: Seeking A Bridge Over Troubled Waters

As reported in China Dialogue, water has always been a flash point between India and Pakistan. The two neighbours compete over use of the waters of the Indus River, the backbone of agriculture and industry in both states. As the Indian subcontinent was partied in 1947 to create the new state of Pakistan, the rivers […]

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The Parched Tiger: India’s Water Tensions With Its Neighbours Start to Bubble Up

Via The Wall Street Journal, an article on India’s water-based politics with its neighbours.  As the report notes: “…India’s water wars with her neighbors are starting to bubble again. Prime Minister Manmohan Singh is supposed to sign a water agreement with Bangladesh Wednesday over use of the Teesta River, which rises in the Himalayas and […]

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The Thirsty Dragon: Mining Tibet, Drying Up Water?

Via China Dialogue, an interesting article examining the impact that China’s hunt for natural resources in Tibet may have upon rivers in the region: China’s fast growth continues, largely financed by state investment and, until very recently, cheap finance from state-owned banks. Fast growth and massive infrastructure construction require heavy usage of metals, energy and […]

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Water: Asia’s New Battleground

Two recent reviews of Water: Asia’s New Battleground, a book by Brahma Chellaney. First, via The Financial Times: “…In Water: Asia’s New Battleground, Chellaney points out that the rise of an Asian middle class, combined with urbanisation and global warming, is putting an enormous strain on Asia’s supply of water. Taken together, China and India […]

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