Defining the Geopolitics of a Thirsty WorldSM
Bangladesh & India: Concerns Over Tipaimukh Dam Project

Via Global Voices, a report on the Tipaimukh Hydroelectric Project being constructed near the confluence of Barak and Tuivai rivers, in Manipur, India and within 100km of Bangladesh border. As the article notes, from the start this project faced protests from potentially affected people in India, and from the downstream neighbor Bangladesh:

“…It is being said that this dam is being built for the greater interest of the people of North Eastern India by controlling the rivers to prevent flood in the Asam region and producing electricity. An information for the readers: according to international laws, without the consent of the downstream river nation and causing environmental damage no one country can control the multi-nation rivers alone. But the sad fact is that nobody cares for these international laws. The might is always right while interpreting these laws. As Bangladesh is not so powerful like India in economic and military contexts we always are pushed aside.

Residents of the North Eastern parts of India were pampered with many baits of the Tipaimukh dam project, but they kept their cool. About 20 influential socio-political organizations in Manipur have united in the banner of “Action Committee against Tipaimukh Project” and are protesting against the project. The reason – this dam will bring more miseries to those people than the profits pledged. And there will be severe damage to the environment…”



This entry was posted on Friday, May 29th, 2009 at 6:26 am and is filed under Bangladesh, India.  You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed.  Both comments and pings are currently closed. 

Comments are closed.


 
© 2022 Water Politics LLC.  'Water Politics', 'water. politics. life', and 'Defining the Geopolitics of a Thirsty World' are service marks of Water Politics LLC.