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Archive for the ‘Uzbekistan’ Category

Chinese Hydroelectric Investments In Central Asia

Via Eurasianet, a look at China’s hydroelectric investments in Central Asia: Any investor wishing to stay friendly with all five Central Asian republics knows to steer clear of major hydropower projects. When the five countries were part of the Soviet Union, interdependence worked: Moscow built some of the world’s tallest dams in upstream Kyrgyzstan and […]

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Transboundary Waters of Central Asia: the Role of Kyrgyzstan in Saving the Aral Sea

Via the Central Asian Bureau for Analytical Reporting, a look at how Kyrgyzstan’s views on how to manage the water resources formed on its territory are at variance with the provisions determined by the Aral Sea Saving Fund: From the beginning of its independence, Kyrgyzstan begins to formulate a policy for the management of water resources […]

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Using Technology and Markets To Solve Water Scarcity In post-Soviet States

Via Smart Water Magazine, a look at how technology and modern market mechanisms can solve water scarcity in post-Soviet states: Uzbekistan is an incredibly dry country, receiving an annual rainfall of just 100 to 300 mm. Nevertheless, Uzbek farmers have managed to significantly increase productivity since the early 1990s, raising the availability of diverse foods […]

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Water Insecurity in Central Asia: A Steppe on the One Belt, One Road Initiative?

Via Future Directions International, a look at water insecurity in Central Asia: Central Asia is integral to Chinese efforts to increase its global connectivity. Natural resource constraints, including access to water, could undermine its influence in the region. Given the legacy of failed foreign water infrastructure in the region, any Chinese efforts to address water […]

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Afghanistan: Water Management For Peace

Courtesy of The Lowry Institute, a report on how Afghan efforts to formalize agreements with neighbouring countries over water usage could go a long way towards preventing conflict: In the optimistic view, Afghanistan is closer to peace today than at any time in the past decades. The presidential election last weekend may have been hampered by low turnout, […]

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Uzbekistan’s Impending Water Crisis

Via The Diplomat, a report on Uzbekistan’s impending water crisis: In November 2018, the first turbine of the Rogun hydropower plant went into operation. On September 9, 2019, the second turbine will be commissioned in honor of Tajikistan’s Independence Day. Tashkent has kept quiet — a break from the country’s past strident opposition to the dam project. […]

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