Defining the Geopolitics of a Thirsty WorldSM
Archive for December, 2019

Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan: Edging Closer To Nile Dam Agreement?

Via the UAE’s The National, an update on Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan’s efforts to reach a Nile dam agreement: Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan have come closer to agreeing on how the giant hydroelectric dam Ethiopia is building on the Blue Nile will be operated, the Sudanese irrigation minister said on Sunday. Cairo is worried the Grand […]

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The Thirsty Dragon: The Invisible Water Shortage In Hebei’s Capital

Via China Dialogue, a report on why – despite the fact that Shijiazhuang in northern China is suffering from a serious water shortage – local people think otherwise: The stalks left after the soy harvest in the village of Tatou are still green. By mid-autumn, most crops in northern China have been harvested. But here […]

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Drought Leaves Southern Africa High and Dry

Via The Wall Street Journal, a look at how Southern Africa’s worsening water crisis ravages crops, livestock and even the continent’s biggest waterfall: Every Monday at 8 p.m. since November, Bulawayo residents have gathered next to their toilets to prepare for a ritual that has come to be known as the big flush—another sign of a […]

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The Indus: The Most Important and Vulnerable ‘Water Tower’

Via The Guardian, an article on the 1.9 billion people at risk from mountain water shortages in the Himalaya: A quarter of the world’s population are at risk of water supply problems as mountain glaciers, snow-packs and alpine lakes are run down by global heating and rising demand, according to an international study. The first inventory of high-altitude […]

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Thirsty Kathmandu Waits For Water That Never Arrives

Via Third Pole.net, a report on how one of the most rapidly urbanising cities on the planet – the capital city of Nepal – is struggling with old projects sabotaged by controversies and bad strategies as its people go thirsty: In May of this year the residents of Nepal’s capital Kathmandu formally established a forum […]

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Water May Help Exacerbate Violent Conflict, But Not Be Initial Cause

Via Future Directions International, commentary on how conflict related to water is more a response to government inability to provide basic services for society, than about water itself: A new tool, launched by the Water, Peace and Security (WPS) Partnership, has identified a number of locations where there is a high risk of water-related conflict. The tool […]

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