Defining the Geopolitics of a Thirsty WorldSM
Archive for August, 2018

Iraq and Iran Dam Co-operation Could Signal Positive Change, but Long-Term Solutions are Necessary to Solve the Water Crisis

Via Future Directions International, a look at positive signals of cooperation between Iraq and Iran over water: On 25 July, the Iraqi Minister of Transport, Kazem Finjan al-Hamami announced that Iran has agreed to co-operate on the construction of a new dam on the Shatt al-Arab River. The move has come as Iraq has sought measures to […]

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Afghanistan and Iran: Helmand River Tension

Via Ariana News Afghanistan, a report on Helmand River tension between Afghanistan and Iran: Following comments by the Iran’s Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif on Afghanistan Helmand River, the Afghan Ministry of Foreign Affaris (MoFA) said border waters dispute with Iran will be solved without any political pressures. Jawad Zarif has recently declared that Iran […]

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Water Is a Source of Growing Tension and Violence in the Middle East

Via the World Resources Institute, commentary on the increasingly thirsty Middle East: In the hot, dry Middle East, where populations are growing rapidly and all major rivers cross political borders, water has become a focal point for escalating violence. From the foothills of the Taurus Mountains in Turkey that feed the Tigris and Euphrates rivers […]

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The Water Crises Aren’t Coming—They’re Here

Via Esquire, an interesting look at the world’s water crises: I. All the Water There Is Here’s a concept: paper water. Paper water is water the government grants certain farmers who are drawing water from a river or a watershed in, say, California. The phrase describes the water the farmer, under premium conditions, is entitled […]

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Water Shortages Weigh Heavily On Afghanistan

Via Global Voices, an interesting look at Afghanistan’s water crisis: Landlocked Afghanistan wasn’t always short of water. Historically the valleys in this part of Asia were agricultural heartlands that hosted rushing rivers fed by abundant glaciers. Now, things are changing. A hot, dry summer has exacerbated a severe drought that has affected northern and western […]

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India’s Controversial Afghanistan Dams

Via The Diplomat, an article on how Indian-built dams in Afghanistan are causing trouble with downstream states Iran and Pakistan: India is expected to begin work on the $236 million Shahtoot Dam project on the Kabul River in Afghanistan in the coming weeks. Scheduled to be completed in three years, the dam has evoked concern in […]

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