Defining the Geopolitics of a Thirsty WorldSM
Archive for May, 2018

The Thirsty Dragon: China’s Water Crisis Revisited

Courtesy of the China Policy Institute, a look at China’s water crisis: The question arises as to whether China can pull out of its current nose-dive towards an environmental catastrophe? The question is the same whether this be Earth (soil pollution), Air (pollution), Fire (energy) or Water. In this instance we will focus on water. […]

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Drought Grips Afghanistan

Via Ariana News, a report on Afghanistan’s increasing water stress: More than two million Afghans at risk of becoming severely food insecure due to the ongoing drought which affecting two-thirds of the country, the UN Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) said in a report released on Monday. The report said that water points […]

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The Parched Tiger: Indian Dam Reduces Pakistan’s Indus Share

Via The Asia Times, a report on how Pakistan is bracing for a potentially grave water crisis as India inaugurates new dam that will divert the crucial Kishanganga River: Pakistan is bracing for a grave water crisis because of climate change and India’s tacit ‘control and management policy’ on the flow of water from the […]

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The Thirsty Dragon: China’s Water Stress On The Rise

Via The China Policy Institute, a look at China’s water stress: Water stress levels in many parts of China are very high, due to low levels of water supply and very high levels of demand. And new research shows the situation is worsening. Using the baseline water stress metric developed for WRI’s Aqueduct Water Risk […]

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In a Warming West, the Rio Grande Is Drying Up

Courtesy of the New York Times (subscription required), a look at how – even in a good year – much of the Rio Grandeis diverted for irrigation but, in 2018, it’s only May and the river is already turning to sand: Mario Rosales, who farms 365 acres along the Rio Grande, knows the river is […]

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Leaked Report: Cambodia’s Biggest Dam Could ‘Literally Kill’ Mekong

Via The Guardian, an article on the heavy impact of a planned hydroelectric dam on the Mekong: A Chinese-backed plan to build Cambodia’s biggest dam could “literally kill” the Mekong river, according to a confidential assessment seen by the Guardian which says that the proposed site at Sambor is the “worst possible place” for hydropower. […]

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